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Ostrich - (Easton's Bible Dictionary)

(Lam. 4:3), the rendering of Hebrew pl. enim; so called from its greediness and gluttony. The allusion here is to the habit of the ostrich with reference to its eggs, which is thus described: "The outer layer of eggs is generally so ill covered that they are destroyed in quantities by jackals, wild-cats, etc., and that the natives carry them away, only taking care not to leave the marks of their footsteps, since, when the ostrich comes and finds that her nest is discovered, she crushes the whole brood, and builds a nest elsewhere." In Job 39:13 this word in the Authorized Version is the rendering of a Hebrew word (notsah) which means "feathers," as in the Revised Version. In the same verse the word "peacocks" of the Authorized Version is the rendering of the Hebrew pl. renanim, properly meaning "ostriches," as in the Revised Version. (See [454]OWL [1].)

Ostrich - (Webster's 1828 Dictionary)

OS'TRICH, n. [L. struthio-camelus; Gr. a sparrow, and an ostrich. The meaning of the name is not obvious. Eng. strut, L. struthio, Gr., L. avis. The primary sense of struz, struthio, _c. is to reach, stretch, extend or erect; but whether this name was given to the fowl from its stately walk or appearance, or from some part of its plumage, let the reader judge.]

A fowl now considered as constituting a distinct genus, the Struthio. This is the largest of all fowls, being four feet high from the ground to the top of the back and seven, eight, and it is said even ten to the top of the head, when standing erect. Its thighs and the sides of the body are naked, and the wings are so short as to be unfit for flying. The plumage is elegant, and much used in ornamental and showy dress. The speed of this fowl in running exceeds that of the fleetest horse.

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